Perudo (Liar’s Dice)

Perudo (Liar’s Dice)

£10

Liar's dice is a class of dice games for two or more players requiring the ability to deceive and detect an opponent's deception. Five dice are used per player with dice cups used for concealment. A player has the option to say ""spot on"" (known as ""calza"", ""jonti"" or ""exactly"" in some variants) where an exact prediction can win a dice. Jonti cannot be called when only 2 players are left. Also, Aces are always wild and we do not play with Calzone rounds as in some other Perudo variants.  

Rolling to see who bids first

Players start with a beaker and five dice of their chosen colour. To begin the game, all players roll a single die to see who will bid first. The player with the highest die wins the right to bid first. In the event of a tie, the players who tied roll again. If a player mistakenly rolls *all* their dice at this time, they lose their right to roll in this section of the game.

Example 1: Who goes first?

Player A - 1 x 4 (i.e. rolls one Four)

Player B - 1 x 3 (i.e. rolls one Three)

Player C - rolls all dice (i.e. loses right to roll, the dice are not considered)

Player A: bids first as she has the highest die

Rolling

Once the play order has been decided, all the player's roll their dice together by upturning their beaker and using it to shield their dice from the other players to keep the dice values secret. Players should not touch their dice once they have rolled and should always give the dice a good shake before rolling.

 

Bidding

Each player then it takes it in turn to bid for the duration of the round or until they are out. To bid, a player must state a dice-quantity and a die face-value (an example bid is ""three two's""). When they bid players must estimate the *total number* of dice in play which have a specified face-value (i.e. not just the players' own dice, but those of all the other players' dice as well). They should then try to call either this value or a lower quantity. The next player must then decide if they believe this bid is too high (i.e. if the actual total quantity of dice with this face-value is less) or if they believe it is probable. If they think the bid is too high, they can call

Doodoo/Bullshit/Lie (see Doodoo below), if they accept the bid, they must enter their bid which must raise either the face-value of the die or the quantity called (they can do both should they wish).

When a player calls Doodoo the round ends and *all* the players reveal *all* their dice. If the challenged bid was valid the player calling Doodoo loses a die. If the challenged bid was insufficient, and the Doodoo was justified, the player entering the false bid loses a die. The next round starts, the players shake and roll their remaining dice and the player who has jsut lost a die leads the bidding. If the player has lost all their dice then they are out, and the next player begins the bidding.

Example 2: Basic bidding & Doodoo

Player A - (3 x 2) + (2 x 6) (i.e. rolls three Two's and two Sixes)

Player B - (1 x 2) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Two and four Fives)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

Player A: bids 3 x 2 (estimates that a total of four Two's are held in total by all the players, but decides to call a 'safer' opening bid of 3 x 2 (i.e. three Two's.))

Player B: bids 4 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player C: bids 4 x 4 (raising the dice face-value)

Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player B: bids 6 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid and the dice face-value)

Player C: thinks this is unlikely/feels the squeeze and calls Doodoo

The dice are revealed: Player C was right to call Doodoo, a total of only 4 x 5's exist and Player B has them all

Player B: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

Bidding - Wild Aces and Ace bids

To make things a little more interesting, any aces (ie dies with a face-value of One) are considered wild. i.e. Any aces in any player's hand are also counted when totting up the number of die with the face-value called by the current bidder. E.g., if three players each have an ace and each player also has a single two, if a bid of 6 x 2 is called (i.e six Two's) the bid is actually correct, as the aces, in their capacity as wild die, are also counted as Twos. It is important to note that Aces lose there wild status in a Calzone round (see Calzone below).

Bidding - Ace conversion

If a player wishes they can also make a bid in aces. Ace bids need only reach half the quantity of the previous bid. E.g. A bid of 2 x 2 can be legitimately followed by a bid of 1 x Ace. Where the previous bid quantity is an odd number, the ace bid must be half of the next even quantity. E.g. A bid of 3 x 4 would have to be followed by a minimum ace bid of 2 x Ace. If a player is following an ace-bid and wishes to convert to a higher die face-value, they must call twice the number of aces in the preceeding bid plus one. E.g. A bid following an ace-bid of 3 x Ace, would need to be at least 7 strong, e.g. 7 x 4. There is no restriction on how many times bids may convert to and from ace-bids, but they must meet this rule each time. Players can not bid in aces when they are making the opening bid unless it is a Calzone round.

Ace bid conversion formulae for minimum next bid:

New bid-quantity (where X is the previous bid quantity) = ( X + 1 ) / 2, rounded down

New bid-quantity (where X is the previous ace-bid quantity) = ( X x 2 ) + 1

Example 3: integrating ace-bids

Player A - (2 x 2) + (2 x 6) + (1 x 1) (i.e. rolls two Two's, two Sixes and one Ace)

Player B - (1 x 2) + (2 x 5) + (2 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two, two Fives and two Aces)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

Player A: bids 2 x 6 (see Dogspangle)

Player B: bids 3 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player C: bids 4 x 5 (raising the dice face-value)

Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player B: bids 3 x 1 (converting to an ace-bid by halving & rounding the previous bid quantity)

Player C: bids 7 x 2 (converting back from an ace-bid by doubling the ace-bid quantity and adding one)

Player A: calls Doodoo

The dice are revealed: There are actually 5 x 2 and 3 x 1, so Doodoo was a bad call in this case. The dice could actually support a call of up to 8 x 2

Player A: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

 

Bidding - Jonti (spot on)

If a player makes a bid and another player believes that this bid actually reflects the *exact* quantity of the specified die face-value in play, then they should call Jonti. When Jonti is called, the round ends and all the dice are revealed. If correct, the player calling Jonti is awarded a die, bringing it back in to play. If incorrect, the calling player loses a die. E.g. If Player A makes a bid of 3 x 2 and Player B calls Jonti, it is only a correct call if there are *exactly* 3 x 2 (including any wild aces that are in play). No player can have more than the maximum five die in play (and so Jonti should only be called by a player who has less than five die in play)! Jonti must be called *before* any subsequent bid is placed, and Jonti cannot be called by an adjacent player i.e. when the bid has been made by the player preceding you. Hence, Jonti can never be called in a two-person round. A successful call of Jonti has an added bonus as the player also starts the bidding in the next round.

Example 6: Jonti

Player A has 3 dice, Player B and Player C have the maximimum of five each. Player A - (2 x 2) + (1 x 1) (i.e. has 3 dice in play;

rolls two Two's and one Ace)

Player B - (2 x 2) + (3 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two and three Aces)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Three and four Fives)

Player A: bids 3 x 6 (see Advanced Dogspangle)

Player B: bids 4 x 6 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player A: calls Jonti

The dice are revealed: There are no sixes but there are 4 x 1 which count as four sixes, so its a good Jonti call from Player A

Player A: Gets a die back and now has 4 dice, and starts the bidding in the next round

Oware is an abstract strategy game among the bigger Mancala family of board games (or Pit and Pebbles Games)

Liar's dice is a class of dice games for two or more players requiring the ability to deceive and detect an opponent's deception. Five dice are used per player with dice cups used for concealment. A player has the option to say ""spot on"" (known as ""calza"", ""jonti"" or ""exactly"" in some variants) where an exact prediction can win a dice. Jonti cannot be called when only 2 players are left. Also, Aces are always wild and we do not play with Calzone rounds as in some other Perudo variants.  

Rolling to see who bids first

Players start with a beaker and five dice of their chosen colour. To begin the game, all players roll a single die to see who will bid first. The player with the highest die wins the right to bid first. In the event of a tie, the players who tied roll again. If a player mistakenly rolls *all* their dice at this time, they lose their right to roll in this section of the game.

Example 1: Who goes first?

Player A - 1 x 4 (i.e. rolls one Four)

Player B - 1 x 3 (i.e. rolls one Three)

Player C - rolls all dice (i.e. loses right to roll, the dice are not considered)

Player A: bids first as she has the highest die

Rolling

Once the play order has been decided, all the player's roll their dice together by upturning their beaker and using it to shield their dice from the other players to keep the dice values secret. Players should not touch their dice once they have rolled and should always give the dice a good shake before rolling.

 

Bidding

Each player then it takes it in turn to bid for the duration of the round or until they are out. To bid, a player must state a dice-quantity and a die face-value (an example bid is ""three two's""). When they bid players must estimate the *total number* of dice in play which have a specified face-value (i.e. not just the players' own dice, but those of all the other players' dice as well). They should then try to call either this value or a lower quantity. The next player must then decide if they believe this bid is too high (i.e. if the actual total quantity of dice with this face-value is less) or if they believe it is probable. If they think the bid is too high, they can call

Doodoo/Bullshit/Lie (see Doodoo below), if they accept the bid, they must enter their bid which must raise either the face-value of the die or the quantity called (they can do both should they wish).

When a player calls Doodoo the round ends and *all* the players reveal *all* their dice. If the challenged bid was valid the player calling Doodoo loses a die. If the challenged bid was insufficient, and the Doodoo was justified, the player entering the false bid loses a die. The next round starts, the players shake and roll their remaining dice and the player who has jsut lost a die leads the bidding. If the player has lost all their dice then they are out, and the next player begins the bidding.

Example 2: Basic bidding & Doodoo

Player A - (3 x 2) + (2 x 6) (i.e. rolls three Two's and two Sixes)

Player B - (1 x 2) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Two and four Fives)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

Player A: bids 3 x 2 (estimates that a total of four Two's are held in total by all the players, but decides to call a 'safer' opening bid of 3 x 2 (i.e. three Two's.))

Player B: bids 4 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player C: bids 4 x 4 (raising the dice face-value)

Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player B: bids 6 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid and the dice face-value)

Player C: thinks this is unlikely/feels the squeeze and calls Doodoo

The dice are revealed: Player C was right to call Doodoo, a total of only 4 x 5's exist and Player B has them all

Player B: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

Bidding - Wild Aces and Ace bids

To make things a little more interesting, any aces (ie dies with a face-value of One) are considered wild. i.e. Any aces in any player's hand are also counted when totting up the number of die with the face-value called by the current bidder. E.g., if three players each have an ace and each player also has a single two, if a bid of 6 x 2 is called (i.e six Two's) the bid is actually correct, as the aces, in their capacity as wild die, are also counted as Twos. It is important to note that Aces lose there wild status in a Calzone round (see Calzone below).

Bidding - Ace conversion

If a player wishes they can also make a bid in aces. Ace bids need only reach half the quantity of the previous bid. E.g. A bid of 2 x 2 can be legitimately followed by a bid of 1 x Ace. Where the previous bid quantity is an odd number, the ace bid must be half of the next even quantity. E.g. A bid of 3 x 4 would have to be followed by a minimum ace bid of 2 x Ace. If a player is following an ace-bid and wishes to convert to a higher die face-value, they must call twice the number of aces in the preceeding bid plus one. E.g. A bid following an ace-bid of 3 x Ace, would need to be at least 7 strong, e.g. 7 x 4. There is no restriction on how many times bids may convert to and from ace-bids, but they must meet this rule each time. Players can not bid in aces when they are making the opening bid unless it is a Calzone round.

Ace bid conversion formulae for minimum next bid:

New bid-quantity (where X is the previous bid quantity) = ( X + 1 ) / 2, rounded down

New bid-quantity (where X is the previous ace-bid quantity) = ( X x 2 ) + 1

Example 3: integrating ace-bids

Player A - (2 x 2) + (2 x 6) + (1 x 1) (i.e. rolls two Two's, two Sixes and one Ace)

Player B - (1 x 2) + (2 x 5) + (2 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two, two Fives and two Aces)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

Player A: bids 2 x 6 (see Dogspangle)

Player B: bids 3 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player C: bids 4 x 5 (raising the dice face-value)

Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player B: bids 3 x 1 (converting to an ace-bid by halving & rounding the previous bid quantity)

Player C: bids 7 x 2 (converting back from an ace-bid by doubling the ace-bid quantity and adding one)

Player A: calls Doodoo

The dice are revealed: There are actually 5 x 2 and 3 x 1, so Doodoo was a bad call in this case. The dice could actually support a call of up to 8 x 2

Player A: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

 

Bidding - Jonti (spot on)

If a player makes a bid and another player believes that this bid actually reflects the *exact* quantity of the specified die face-value in play, then they should call Jonti. When Jonti is called, the round ends and all the dice are revealed. If correct, the player calling Jonti is awarded a die, bringing it back in to play. If incorrect, the calling player loses a die. E.g. If Player A makes a bid of 3 x 2 and Player B calls Jonti, it is only a correct call if there are *exactly* 3 x 2 (including any wild aces that are in play). No player can have more than the maximum five die in play (and so Jonti should only be called by a player who has less than five die in play)! Jonti must be called *before* any subsequent bid is placed, and Jonti cannot be called by an adjacent player i.e. when the bid has been made by the player preceding you. Hence, Jonti can never be called in a two-person round. A successful call of Jonti has an added bonus as the player also starts the bidding in the next round.

Example 6: Jonti

Player A has 3 dice, Player B and Player C have the maximimum of five each. Player A - (2 x 2) + (1 x 1) (i.e. has 3 dice in play;

rolls two Two's and one Ace)

Player B - (2 x 2) + (3 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two and three Aces)

Player C - (1 x 3) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Three and four Fives)

Player A: bids 3 x 6 (see Advanced Dogspangle)

Player B: bids 4 x 6 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

Player A: calls Jonti

The dice are revealed: There are no sixes but there are 4 x 1 which count as four sixes, so its a good Jonti call from Player A

Player A: Gets a die back and now has 4 dice, and starts the bidding in the next round


  • Description

    Description

    Liar’s dice is a class of dice games for two or more players requiring the ability to deceive and detect an opponent’s deception. Five dice are used per player with dice cups used for concealment. A player has the option to say “”spot on”” (known as “”calza””, “”jonti”” or “”exactly”” in some variants) where an exact prediction can win a dice. Jonti cannot be called when only 2 players are left. Also, Aces are always wild and we do not play with Calzone rounds as in some other Perudo variants.  

    Rolling to see who bids first

    Players start with a beaker and five dice of their chosen colour. To begin the game, all players roll a single die to see who will bid first. The player with the highest die wins the right to bid first. In the event of a tie, the players who tied roll again. If a player mistakenly rolls *all* their dice at this time, they lose their right to roll in this section of the game.

    Example 1: Who goes first?

    Player A – 1 x 4 (i.e. rolls one Four)

    Player B – 1 x 3 (i.e. rolls one Three)

    Player C – rolls all dice (i.e. loses right to roll, the dice are not considered)

    Player A: bids first as she has the highest die

    Rolling

    Once the play order has been decided, all the player’s roll their dice together by upturning their beaker and using it to shield their dice from the other players to keep the dice values secret. Players should not touch their dice once they have rolled and should always give the dice a good shake before rolling.

     

    Bidding

    Each player then it takes it in turn to bid for the duration of the round or until they are out. To bid, a player must state a dice-quantity and a die face-value (an example bid is “”three two’s””). When they bid players must estimate the *total number* of dice in play which have a specified face-value (i.e. not just the players’ own dice, but those of all the other players’ dice as well). They should then try to call either this value or a lower quantity. The next player must then decide if they believe this bid is too high (i.e. if the actual total quantity of dice with this face-value is less) or if they believe it is probable. If they think the bid is too high, they can call

    Doodoo/Bullshit/Lie (see Doodoo below), if they accept the bid, they must enter their bid which must raise either the face-value of the die or the quantity called (they can do both should they wish).

    When a player calls Doodoo the round ends and *all* the players reveal *all* their dice. If the challenged bid was valid the player calling Doodoo loses a die. If the challenged bid was insufficient, and the Doodoo was justified, the player entering the false bid loses a die. The next round starts, the players shake and roll their remaining dice and the player who has jsut lost a die leads the bidding. If the player has lost all their dice then they are out, and the next player begins the bidding.

    Example 2: Basic bidding & Doodoo

    Player A – (3 x 2) + (2 x 6) (i.e. rolls three Two’s and two Sixes)

    Player B – (1 x 2) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Two and four Fives)

    Player C – (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

    Player A: bids 3 x 2 (estimates that a total of four Two’s are held in total by all the players, but decides to call a ‘safer’ opening bid of 3 x 2 (i.e. three Two’s.))

    Player B: bids 4 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

    Player C: bids 4 x 4 (raising the dice face-value)

    Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

    Player B: bids 6 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid and the dice face-value)

    Player C: thinks this is unlikely/feels the squeeze and calls Doodoo

    The dice are revealed: Player C was right to call Doodoo, a total of only 4 x 5’s exist and Player B has them all

    Player B: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

    Bidding – Wild Aces and Ace bids

    To make things a little more interesting, any aces (ie dies with a face-value of One) are considered wild. i.e. Any aces in any player’s hand are also counted when totting up the number of die with the face-value called by the current bidder. E.g., if three players each have an ace and each player also has a single two, if a bid of 6 x 2 is called (i.e six Two’s) the bid is actually correct, as the aces, in their capacity as wild die, are also counted as Twos. It is important to note that Aces lose there wild status in a Calzone round (see Calzone below).

    Bidding – Ace conversion

    If a player wishes they can also make a bid in aces. Ace bids need only reach half the quantity of the previous bid. E.g. A bid of 2 x 2 can be legitimately followed by a bid of 1 x Ace. Where the previous bid quantity is an odd number, the ace bid must be half of the next even quantity. E.g. A bid of 3 x 4 would have to be followed by a minimum ace bid of 2 x Ace. If a player is following an ace-bid and wishes to convert to a higher die face-value, they must call twice the number of aces in the preceeding bid plus one. E.g. A bid following an ace-bid of 3 x Ace, would need to be at least 7 strong, e.g. 7 x 4. There is no restriction on how many times bids may convert to and from ace-bids, but they must meet this rule each time. Players can not bid in aces when they are making the opening bid unless it is a Calzone round.

    Ace bid conversion formulae for minimum next bid:

    New bid-quantity (where X is the previous bid quantity) = ( X + 1 ) / 2, rounded down

    New bid-quantity (where X is the previous ace-bid quantity) = ( X x 2 ) + 1

    Example 3: integrating ace-bids

    Player A – (2 x 2) + (2 x 6) + (1 x 1) (i.e. rolls two Two’s, two Sixes and one Ace)

    Player B – (1 x 2) + (2 x 5) + (2 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two, two Fives and two Aces)

    Player C – (1 x 3) + (2 x 2) + (3 x 4) (i.e. rolls one Three and two Twos and three Fours)

    Player A: bids 2 x 6 (see Dogspangle)

    Player B: bids 3 x 5 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

    Player C: bids 4 x 5 (raising the dice face-value)

    Player A: bids 5 x 2 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

    Player B: bids 3 x 1 (converting to an ace-bid by halving & rounding the previous bid quantity)

    Player C: bids 7 x 2 (converting back from an ace-bid by doubling the ace-bid quantity and adding one)

    Player A: calls Doodoo

    The dice are revealed: There are actually 5 x 2 and 3 x 1, so Doodoo was a bad call in this case. The dice could actually support a call of up to 8 x 2

    Player A: Loses a die and starts the bidding in the next round

     

    Bidding – Jonti (spot on)

    If a player makes a bid and another player believes that this bid actually reflects the *exact* quantity of the specified die face-value in play, then they should call Jonti. When Jonti is called, the round ends and all the dice are revealed. If correct, the player calling Jonti is awarded a die, bringing it back in to play. If incorrect, the calling player loses a die. E.g. If Player A makes a bid of 3 x 2 and Player B calls Jonti, it is only a correct call if there are *exactly* 3 x 2 (including any wild aces that are in play). No player can have more than the maximum five die in play (and so Jonti should only be called by a player who has less than five die in play)! Jonti must be called *before* any subsequent bid is placed, and Jonti cannot be called by an adjacent player i.e. when the bid has been made by the player preceding you. Hence, Jonti can never be called in a two-person round. A successful call of Jonti has an added bonus as the player also starts the bidding in the next round.

    Example 6: Jonti

    Player A has 3 dice, Player B and Player C have the maximimum of five each. Player A – (2 x 2) + (1 x 1) (i.e. has 3 dice in play;

    rolls two Two’s and one Ace)

    Player B – (2 x 2) + (3 x 1) (i.e. rolls one Two and three Aces)

    Player C – (1 x 3) + (4 x 5) (i.e. rolls one Three and four Fives)

    Player A: bids 3 x 6 (see Advanced Dogspangle)

    Player B: bids 4 x 6 (raising the quantity of dice bid)

    Player A: calls Jonti

    The dice are revealed: There are no sixes but there are 4 x 1 which count as four sixes, so its a good Jonti call from Player A

    Player A: Gets a die back and now has 4 dice, and starts the bidding in the next round

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  • Event Details

    Event Details

    Date: 29 August 2022

    Start time: 10:00 BST

    End time: 14:15 BST

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